Networking is done in RS232, RS422, RS423 and RS485 are serial communication methods for computers and devices. RS232 is without doubt the best known interface, because this is used on almost all computers available today. But some of the other interfaces are certainly interesting because they can be used in situations where RS232 is not appropriate. RS232 is an interface to connect one DTE, data terminal equipment to one DCE, data communication equipment at a maximum speed of 20 kbps with a maximum cable length of 50 feet. One of the main problems with RS232 is the lack of immunity for noise on the signal lines. The transmitter and receiver compare the voltages of the data- and handshake lines with one common zero line. Shifts in the ground level can have disastrous effects. Noise is easily picked up and limits both the maximum distance and communication speed.

On the contrary, with RS485 there is no such thing as a common zero as a signal reference. Differential signals and twisting allows RS485 to communicate over much longer communication distances than achievable with RS232. With RS485 communication distances of 1200 m are possible. Several volts difference in the ground level of the RS485 transmitter and receiver does not cause any problems. The RS485 signals are floating and each signal is transmitted over a Sig+ line and a Sig- line. The RS485 receiver compares the voltage difference between both lines, instead of the absolute voltage level on a signal line. This works well and prevents the existence of ground loops, a common source of communication problems. The best results are achieved if the Sig+ and Sig- lines are twisted. The vedio explains why.